Ivory Tower Style

SEX, POWER, AND SUITING? 

Cameron Wolf an article in Business of Fashion magazine that has me perplexed. The thesis of the piece is that skinny suits of the sort designed by Thom Browne and Hedi Slimane have re-injected men’s suits with a forceful thrust of sex and power. “The slim suit is where sex and power converge,” says Wolf.

Perhaps tellingly, the article’s only photo is a picture of Barack Obama wearing a suit that bears no resemblance whatsoever to the skinny, or shrunken, suit popularized by Browne and Slimane (pictured above - Browne suits on top, Slimane for Dior in the black and white photos). Because nothing about the skinny suit projects sex or power.

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…irony tyrannizes us. The reason why our pervasive cultural irony is at once so powerful and so unsatisfying is that an ironist is impossible to pin down. All U.S. irony is based on an implicit “I don’t really mean what I’m saying.” So what does irony as a cultural norm mean to say? That it’s impossible to mean what you say? That maybe it’s too bad it’s impossible, but wake up and smell the coffee already? Most likely, I think, today’s irony ends up saying: “How totally banal of you to ask what I really mean.” Anyone with the heretical gall to ask an ironist what he actually stands for ends up looking like an hysteric or a prig. And herein lies the oppressiveness of institutionalized irony, the too-successful rebel: the ability to interdict the question without attending to its subject is, when exercised, tyranny. It is the new junta, using the very tool that exposed its enemy to insulate itself.
David Foster Wallace

WTF DO YOU CALL THIS THING?

As someone who writes above men’s clothing on a fairly regular basis, you would think I’d have some vocabulary to describe the above object. But I do not. Instead I perform all manner of verbal contortions to avoid naming it. 

You could just call it a “shirt.” This is accurate, but not very precise. In Italian, the word “camicia” means specifically this kind of shirt, one that has buttons on the front and a collar and can be worn with a tie. But in English, “shirt” is a genus, not a species. It can also refer to tee-shirts and Henleys and polos. 

"Collared shirt" is a little more specific but still includes polos. "Button down" might be the most often used, but is inaccurate. Use this term in public enough times and someone will surely take it upon themselves to tell you that "button down" refers to a shirt with a button-down collar, not a buttoned front.

Brooks Brothers uses "dress shirt", but this term used to refer to shirts worn with black and white tie. Maybe that kind of shirt is now archaic enough that we can shift the meaning, but UK retailers such as Budd and Turnbull and Asser still use the term in its original office, and instead use “formal shirt” for the category I’m trying to name, which to this American ear sounds like a tuxedo shirt.

Is the disagreement over the meaning of “dress shirt” broken into British and American sides? Do any American retailers use “dress shirt” to mean a tuxedo shirt? If not, is this dichotomy tenable or should we allow the American side of the “dress shirt” debate to win? 

If we wanted a new word, what should it be? “Button up” shirt? “Button front” shirt? I await your suggestions.

Update:For those proposing “oxford shirt”, oxford refers to the cloth, not the shirt style. 

Photo from No Man Walks Alone.

Nudity is often thought to be the natural condition when we are most simply ourselves, but it is also the state when we can least well tell the social, intellectual, moral condition of the person in front of us. Roman culture, even more than modern society, was obsessed with visible signs of status, honour and position, strongly and clearly marked out. Nudity hides the clothes, jewels and other badges of office which let the world know who this citizen is. A shared space where nakedness in fact concealed a man’s status might well have produced anxiety. Clothes do make the man.
Simon Goldhill, “The Perfect Body
Molapola made the terrible mistake of inviting me to write a guest post on the Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney. I tried to make my review at least as vulgar as the show itself. Sample quote:

The blurb next to a shiny statue of Bob Hope tells us that “by transforming his lowbrow readymades into highbrow art and making his historical sources more contemporary, Koons achieves a kind of democratic leveling of culture.” I question how highbrow the art really is (“highbrow” is one of those terms, like “fornication,” that is mostly used by people who have only an imagined relationship with the concept in question), although the Whitney may actually believe that any art becomes highbrow by virtue of its being shown at the Whitney. But leaving that aside, Koons achieves a democratic leveling of culture by selling balloon dogs for $60 mil like Dolce and Gabbana achieves democratic leveling of fashion by selling $900 track pants.

Read the whole thing here.

Molapola made the terrible mistake of inviting me to write a guest post on the Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney. I tried to make my review at least as vulgar as the show itself. Sample quote:

The blurb next to a shiny statue of Bob Hope tells us that “by transforming his lowbrow readymades into highbrow art and making his historical sources more contemporary, Koons achieves a kind of democratic leveling of culture.” I question how highbrow the art really is (“highbrow” is one of those terms, like “fornication,” that is mostly used by people who have only an imagined relationship with the concept in question), although the Whitney may actually believe that any art becomes highbrow by virtue of its being shown at the Whitney. But leaving that aside, Koons achieves a democratic leveling of culture by selling balloon dogs for $60 mil like Dolce and Gabbana achieves democratic leveling of fashion by selling $900 track pants.

Read the whole thing here.

FASHION IS DEAD! LONG LIVE FASHION!
The first catechism learned by every aspiring Internet Gentleman (which last year displaced Norm MacDonald’s infamous Crack Whore Trainee as the worst job in the world) is that their interest is in style, not fashion, which is for women, or possibly the gays (NTTAWWT). Style is meant to describe timeless grace, easy elegance, and all that rot, while fashion is about runway shows, new (probably Chinese or Russian) money, and brand whoring. One of the most trafficked menswear blogs is even called Permanent Style in homage to this shibboleth.
The second iGent catechism is that style was brought into its most perfect form at some time in the 30s by men of flawless taste and character, and set down in the pages of the trade publication Apparel Arts so that future generations might receive the good word that the question of what gentlemen should wear had been answered.
Anyone who has ever read even a couple of articles in Apparel Arts knows that this is a ruse.  AA was a trade publication. The main target audience was the retail industry. It was not (mainly) a magazine about how to buy or wear clothes. It was a magazine about how to sell clothes. That’s not to say that the ideas aren’t good or the illustrations aren’t charming. It’s a very well done magazine, the kind that hardly exists anymore. But that’s because today’s magazines are aimed at the customer, not the retailer. Hence the endless coverage of what Ryan Gosling is wearing or which of the fragrances sold at the Duty Free shop are most likely to get you in bed with Kate Upton.
But I digress from my thesis, which is that the first two iGent catechisms are contradictory. Apparel Arts never championed “timeless” dress. In fact, quite the opposite, as shown by this quotation, which I stumbled upon in Gent’s Gazette’s article on the drape cut:

…men have been less inclined to buy new suits simply because, but only when their old ones were worn out. Thus the men’s clothing industry has been in a long decline. For there has been nothing to accelerate suit buying, even when times were good, other than price, pattern, and color—all three very weak as compared to the slate wiping effect of a sudden and complete model change.
The war ended the age of style and inaugurated the age of fashion. That was not apparent at the time, but its truth has become increasingly evident every year since. In other words, the days when manufacturers could with impunity “put over a style,” in disregard of the trend of authentic fashion, were really at an end the moment the period of post-war disenchantment began. Some manufacturers learned the lesson soon, others late, but all learned it, some with greater sorrow than others, as the years rolled by. Fashion, for men, became concerned with minutiae of accessories and embellishments, brooking no change in the basic structure of “coat, vest, and pants”, in which sales, most naturally, lagged behind.
…
Draped clothing must be sold on an entirely new basis. That is the danger—and that is the big advantage. It offers a chance to wipe the slate clean—to batter down all the old conceptions—to make men realize that they need new suits now, not because the old ones are worn out, not because there is lofty economic patriotism in a “buy now” decision, but because, at last, the time has come when one’s old suits are “dated” by something more than wear.

Read carefully here. Not only does the author lament that the basic structure of coat, vest, and pants remains unchanged, he calls this era of ossification the Age of Fashion. And he calls what preceded it - presumably with a rapid churn of different cuts and details, which accelerated suit-buying - the Age of Style. So not only is style not permanent, even the matching of word to concept is not permanent. Apparel Arts, iGent Bible, did indeed advocate for “style, not fashion.” But in doing so it meant the exact opposite of what the phrase means today.

FASHION IS DEAD! LONG LIVE FASHION!

The first catechism learned by every aspiring Internet Gentleman (which last year displaced Norm MacDonald’s infamous Crack Whore Trainee as the worst job in the world) is that their interest is in style, not fashion, which is for women, or possibly the gays (NTTAWWT). Style is meant to describe timeless grace, easy elegance, and all that rot, while fashion is about runway shows, new (probably Chinese or Russian) money, and brand whoring. One of the most trafficked menswear blogs is even called Permanent Style in homage to this shibboleth.

The second iGent catechism is that style was brought into its most perfect form at some time in the 30s by men of flawless taste and character, and set down in the pages of the trade publication Apparel Arts so that future generations might receive the good word that the question of what gentlemen should wear had been answered.

Anyone who has ever read even a couple of articles in Apparel Arts knows that this is a ruse.

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Blaggers

(sung to the tune of ‘Royals’ by Lorde)

I’ve never seen a rental tux in the flesh
I taught the rules of wedding dress to the forums
And I’m not proud of my URL
And the blogs I write, no traffic envy

But every post is like new suit, fresh shoes, selfie in the bathroom,
Sprezz photos, no socks, instakoppin’ Karthoum,
We don’t care, we’re getting reblogged in our dreams.
But everybody’s like Pitti wall, first class, posin’ with your pocket square,
Seven folds, tartans, patina on a Corsair,
We don’t care, we got our own black tie affair.

And we’ll never be blaggers (blaggers).
It don’t run in our blood,
That kind of luxe swap ain’t for us.
We crave a different kind of buzz.
Let me be your Tumblr (Tumblr)
You can “like” my selfie
And baby I’ll rule, I’ll rule, I’ll rule, I’ll rule.
Let me wear that Aubercy.

My e-friends and iGents, we ignore la mode.
We count on style and not fashion unless it’s Arnys.
And everyone who knows us knows that we’re fine with this,
We don’t blog for money.

But every post is like new suit, fresh shoes, selfie in the bathroom,
Sprezz photos, no socks, instakoppin’ Karthoum,
We don’t care, we’re getting reblogged in our dreams.
But everybody’s like Pitti wall, first class, posin’ with your pocket squares,
Seven folds, tartans, patina on a Corsair,
We don’t care, we got our own black tie affair.

And we’ll never be blaggers (blaggers).
It don’t run in our blood,
That kind of luxe swap ain’t for us.
We crave a different kind of buzz.
Let me be your Tumblr (Tumblr)
You can “like” my selfie
And baby I’ll rule, I’ll rule, I’ll rule, I’ll rule.
Let me wear that Aubercy.

Each of us have the parts of our wardrobe where we feel more adventurous and those where we find ourselves returning to the comfort of familiarity. Maybe it’s not surprising that pants, being the garment that covers the most sensitive parts, are an area in which men are quite risk averse. Most tend to wear blue jeans with casual wear, and gray wool pants - perhaps in flannel for the winter and fresco for the summer - with sportcoats. Add in cotton or linen pants in some shade of beige and you have already described maybe nine out of ten of the non-suit pants worn by well-dressed men.    
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There are good reasons for this conservatism even apart from a desire to avoid promiscuity in what girds your loins. Anything unusual calls for attention, and your lower half is generally not where you’d like people to focus. Consider that the most easily recognizable loud pants are worn for golf, Nantucket, and Ivy League universities, which is quite a powerful troika of douchebaggery.
Still, it might be nice to wear something other than light gray flannels all winter long. So I therefore present to you…(drumroll)…the light BROWN flannel. It’s not light gray, but it’s unobtrusive enough to keep people from staring at your crotch all day long.
It seems like a simple idea, but I couldn’t to find flannel I wanted in the right shade and weight. Luckily I was able to use Greg of No Man Walks Alone to convince Fox to do a special run of fabric for us in a 14/15 ounce weight.*
You can see in picture above the yarn that will be used to weave the cloth. Underneath the yarn is my jacket made of London Lounge oats linen, to provide as a point of comparison a cloth that some of you might know. Since this is a special fabric Fox is designing and making just for us, they had no swatch to send us, and the cost of making a test run proved prohibitive. But I’m expecting it to be just a bit browner than the pants on the smoking mustochioed gent on the right in this picture, from Apparel Arts via Gentleman’s Gazette:

and a little less yellow than the pants on the guy (unfortunately also wearing a neckerchief and playing golf) in this Apparel Arts picture from the 1934 Summer/Resort wear issue (back then, flannel was considered a summer fabric):

The caption confirms that gray flannels were already getting a bit tired 80 years ago: “The fawn colored slack, of course, comes in as a successor to the grey flannel slack, which was just about eligible for a pension anyway.”
14/15 ounces is a pretty hefty weight, but I believe it’s the right one. The extra weight helps the pants fall straighter and move more gracefully as you walk. Or dance, as Fred Astaire does here in a suit made of Fox Flannel (Fox actually held a trademark on ‘Flannel’ until the 50s). Note how the trouser cuffs stay right around his ankles as he jumps around the dance floor with Eleanor Powell. Compare with Obama’s trousers in this video. A mere leisurely stroll causes his cuffs to go flouncing around like a Vegas showgirl. If the leader of the free world can’t make lightweight trousers fall straight, the author of this blog will not even try. So 15 ounces it is. Overheating is mostly a problem on the top half anyway, since that’s where you wear more layers. 
If you want to join me in ordering some of this fabric, send me an email at david@nomanwalksalone.com. Price is $140/m. Delivery is expected in early September, which should give us just enough time to get our pants made in time for the cold weather.  

*Full disclosure: I am the editor the No Man Walks Alone blog, but I receive no commission on sales of this cloth or any other product. I am paying full price for the fabric I ordered, which I hope will become two pairs of pants before winter strikes.

Each of us have the parts of our wardrobe where we feel more adventurous and those where we find ourselves returning to the comfort of familiarity. Maybe it’s not surprising that pants, being the garment that covers the most sensitive parts, are an area in which men are quite risk averse. Most tend to wear blue jeans with casual wear, and gray wool pants - perhaps in flannel for the winter and fresco for the summer - with sportcoats. Add in cotton or linen pants in some shade of beige and you have already described maybe nine out of ten of the non-suit pants worn by well-dressed men.    

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A NEW PLACE
I have moved to New York for a few months, which means that I have an obligation to become completely insufferable to all non-New Yorkers, starting with whichever of you fall into that category. Thus this self-centered, rambling post. 
I have always worried that I’m not cool enough to live in New York. I don’t really know what the young kids are wearing these days. My single, lonely, unloved pair of blue jeans probably rue the day they first went home with me. The very idea of associating blue jeans with coolness probably became obsolete a few years before I was born, but lives on in my anachronistic brain.
There was a brief moment on my last day in DC when I thought my current wardrobe had been granted a last minute pardon from a semester of “why are you so dressed up?” questions. Someone whom I admire greatly told me, “Nobody wears jeans in Brooklyn anymore.” (“Oh?”) But then my hopes were dashed. “Everybody wears sweatpants now.” (“Oh.”) 
I remember just before I went to college telling a (probably appalled) family friend that I looked forward to an opportunity to reinvent myself on a blank slate of complete strangers. There’s a temptation - for everyone, but young people especially -  to believe that if you were just a different person, you’d be so much happier.
This time I’m moving to a place that isn’t so strange and with a self that has grown less malleable. I am not planning a reinvention. But places, like great books, are mirrors, and each distorts our reflection in a different way. When confronted with a new one, we can see ourselves in ways that we didn’t before. As I get to know this city better, I hope I will get to know a new part of myself, too. But I don’t think I’ll be buying any sweatpants.     

A NEW PLACE

I have moved to New York for a few months, which means that I have an obligation to become completely insufferable to all non-New Yorkers, starting with whichever of you fall into that category. Thus this self-centered, rambling post. 

I have always worried that I’m not cool enough to live in New York. I don’t really know what the young kids are wearing these days. My single, lonely, unloved pair of blue jeans probably rue the day they first went home with me. The very idea of associating blue jeans with coolness probably became obsolete a few years before I was born, but lives on in my anachronistic brain.

There was a brief moment on my last day in DC when I thought my current wardrobe had been granted a last minute pardon from a semester of “why are you so dressed up?” questions. Someone whom I admire greatly told me, “Nobody wears jeans in Brooklyn anymore.” (“Oh?”) But then my hopes were dashed. “Everybody wears sweatpants now.” (“Oh.”) 

I remember just before I went to college telling a (probably appalled) family friend that I looked forward to an opportunity to reinvent myself on a blank slate of complete strangers. There’s a temptation - for everyone, but young people especially -  to believe that if you were just a different person, you’d be so much happier.

This time I’m moving to a place that isn’t so strange and with a self that has grown less malleable. I am not planning a reinvention. But places, like great books, are mirrors, and each distorts our reflection in a different way. When confronted with a new one, we can see ourselves in ways that we didn’t before. As I get to know this city better, I hope I will get to know a new part of myself, too. But I don’t think I’ll be buying any sweatpants.     

nomanwalksalone:

FORCED TO TRAVEL LIGHT
by David Isle
Travel rewards improvisation more than inflexibile, even if careful, planning. Something always goes wrong. My current trip began with disaster. After years of assiduously limiting myself to carry-ons for years, the exigencies of two weeks in Naples, one on the Amalfi coast, and a few Pitti-ful days in Florence, followed by a wedding in Rhode Island on the way back home to Washington forced me to check luggage. Which, of course, the airline lost.
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Well, I didn’t exactly plan a two-month lacuna in this blog, but between traveling (see above) and writing for other blogs (also see above, among others), it just happened.
But now I have arrived in Florence and will turn my attentions to Pitti #menswear for 4 days straight on behalf of Styleforum. My introductory post is here, but you can get full coverage from me and Synthese, who will write about Streetwear and Denim, by following the pitti86 tag on Styleforum.
A presto.

nomanwalksalone:

FORCED TO TRAVEL LIGHT

by David Isle

Travel rewards improvisation more than inflexibile, even if careful, planning. Something always goes wrong. My current trip began with disaster. After years of assiduously limiting myself to carry-ons for years, the exigencies of two weeks in Naples, one on the Amalfi coast, and a few Pitti-ful days in Florence, followed by a wedding in Rhode Island on the way back home to Washington forced me to check luggage. Which, of course, the airline lost.

Read More

Well, I didn’t exactly plan a two-month lacuna in this blog, but between traveling (see above) and writing for other blogs (also see above, among others), it just happened.

But now I have arrived in Florence and will turn my attentions to Pitti #menswear for 4 days straight on behalf of Styleforum. My introductory post is here, but you can get full coverage from me and Synthese, who will write about Streetwear and Denim, by following the pitti86 tag on Styleforum.

A presto.